Gather around our Bankwhitt Table

Check out the variety in our feast of Life.

Banquet Table(- these links open in new screen) – and keep scrolling down


 1.  Church

– includes gathering, assembly, following Jesus 


2. Mother’s Encouragement 

– includes mothers, children, parenting, family


3. Recipes

 – some of our family’s favourites


4.  Migraine + Health

– triggers, acid vs alkali, nutrients, food groups …


5. Homeschooling

We call ourselves “BankWhitt Academy”. 

 – also check out www.nzhomeed.wordpress.com for New Zealand homeschooling information and helps)

6. Lapbooking

 – creative topic study presentation folders


My family’s web presence:

7. The Counsellor

– husband

8. Kiwikids

– children (untouched lately)
                                                                                                             
 

While he is away …

While he is away …

Make a Plan

  • Be Patient and Trustful
  • Keep your spirit uplifted and your body healthy and vigorous
  • Keep yourself busy
  • Serve someone else – don’t live in survival mode or selfish mode
  • Invite someone over for a homemade meal who lives alone.
  • Take a meal to a friend.
  • Write a note of encouragement to someone.
  • Get outside of yourself.

 

Hang Out With Yourself

  • Make some fun for yourself. Treat Yourself List your ways here ….
  • Lose yourself in a good cup of tea – it can change the world
  • Play guitar or keyboard – learn some new tunes
  • Go to bed way before midnight.
  • Keep exercising regularly and start taking dancing or gym classes.
  • Start a new course or hobby. Establish little goals and work on enhancing your abilities in a certain field or focus on learning a new skill or language.
  • Catch up on your TV Shows – or art and craft that you haven’t done for a while
  • Acknowledge your feelings. Don’t go in to hiding.
  • Plot his journey on a map. Pray blessings on his days.
  • Keep note of your feelings plus the big topics of conversation to talk about on his return (not the first day). Some things are not best to talk/write about on cellphone.

 

Have A True Girls’ Night

  • Do things that build relationships with those you know or those that you don’t yet know.
  • Catch up with some old friends you haven’t seen in a while – do girly things eg. haircut, mani/pedi.
  • Make good on that promise of coffee with a friend you haven’t seen in awhile.
  • Surround yourself with friends and go out with them. Plan dinners, movies and other interesting social events, and invite people over more often.
  • Be diligent in carving out time to be in God’s Word. Focus your heart, worries and affections on God
  • On his return … be patient and trusting; allow time for re-adjustment and for the traveller to rest and re-group.
  • From a variety of websites, 4 May 2017

Check out these options / ideas …

No timetable needed

Making an application for exemption from a registered school?clock swirl

No timetable is needed.
But you do need to indicate (acc to law, s.21) “as regularly and as well”.

We made a comment, in our exemption application, about regular meals around the dining table; more sit down, schooly stuff in the morning; and tend to do more creative or outside activities in afternoon – yet being flexible enough to respond to Grandma’s visit or other events or occasions that arose.

:: Keep vague, flexible, and yet include stuff that keeps MOE happy.

Russian Squares

Russian Squares

Melt

5oz [150g] butter

50z sugar [white / brown]

1 T golden syrup

Mix

2 c flour

1 c sultanas [etc]

1 beaten egg

essence to flavour – vanilla or butterscotch

Mix together.

1 t baking powder [mix in warm milk]

Quickly blend in. Put in swiss roll tin.

Bake at 165°C [325°F] until golden brown [about 15 mins on fanbake].

Can ice with lemon icing while hot [I don’t].

Leave to cool in tin then cut into squares.

4Cs – 21st Century Skills

These competencies — known as 21st-century skills — are summed up as the “4Cs”).

They include the following:

Collaboration:
Students are able to work effectively with diverse groups and exercise flexibility in making compromises to achieve common goals.

Creativity:
Students are able to generate and improve on original ideas and also work creatively with others.

Communication:
Students are able to communicate effectively across multiple media and for various purposes.

Critical thinking:
Students are able to analyze, evaluate, and understand complex systems and apply strategies to solve problems.

Home Educators – choose community

Mothers, Home educators do not have to work alone.

Draw people in to your family life/school/work – aunties (real or adopted), grandies, other homeschooled families …

3 (or is that 4?) First Thoughts on Home Education

1. Relax and enjoy family life.bigstockphoto_Our_Mum_624059

2. Don’t worry about spending big lots of money in your first years – by then you’ll find out that you don’t need to spend heaps of money.

3. Decide what your family’s priorities/mottoes are and then put the time in to your top priorities.
Ask yourself: what do we want our children to “look” like by age of 16-18 yo? what qualities do we value?

4. Relax and enjoy family life.

My Take on Home Education after 12 years

A rant from a home educator (and trained HS teacher, ESOL tutor, and counsellor)

I’m not judging anyone, just outlining how I see home education ::Featured image

Why do we need programs for this and that? curriculum / curricula for our 6 year old?

Did we not choose to leave institutional schooling to have a life of freedom? a life where children can enjoy the discovery of learning, instead of offering them preprocessed sausage meat?!

Our children love to learn, have a curiosity for the world around them – especially when we get them away from workbooks and in to the real world around them. This is the great benefit of homeschooling, home education, natural learning, worldschooling (call it what you will).

Parks, libraries, other families are the wonderful assets in your education journey. Don’t fret about public schoolers’ comments or expectations of whanau.

Set your sights on the character and attitudes of your children for when they are 16-18 years old. Train them, guide them, love them, have fun with them.

Don’t waste childhood on workbooks and dreary stuff. Watch a ‘Magic Schoolbus’ video, climb on the playground at your local park, or go to the confidence/ adventure course nearby, check out the egyptian mummy/ dinosaur exhibition at your local museum. Or take a week or so to go to Te Papa. Have adventures.

Do the stuff that lights their/your fire and passion. Ease up. Your children can’t help but to learn – your job is to strew interesting things around the house, provide a creative environment, and widen your children’s world.

NCEA is not really your primary goal – raising creative adventurous young people who are equipped to face a changing world would be better. Young people who will contribute to society in a positive way. People don’t tend to gain or lose jobs on the strengths of their qualifications, rather their positive attitude and emotional health. Someone who is punctual, trustworthy, polite, follows instructions, uses initiative, honest.

Let’s maximise the benefits of home education – not just replicate schools.

Coming from a family of teachers, I internally fought/worried especially for the first year over ‘are my kids doing enough’ and then realised I had to trust my children and relax a whole lot. It was a huge struggle for me to let go of my schooly preconceptions – and let the children make a few more choices. Yes, HS and the style we choose is family choice, but we can (are able to) change/evolve our approach/es along the way.
When you feel down or stressed as home educator, maybe that is the time to mix things up a bit.

People learn best when relaxed and enjoying the process.