Ways to do Homeschool Mathematics (without a Textbook)

Maths concepts can be taught mentally very well and without textbooks until about 12 years old.

  • times tables – rap rote, skip counting … also divisionmathpostcard

  • Rolling dice and getting him to visualise the number rather than counting them individually.

  • mental arithmetic is excellent :: if i have this many and you eat this many … how many left?

  • Use fingers to show patterns, skip jumping/counting, read stories with maths concepts in them, read recipes.

  • Baking

  • Make a pizza pie together, make symmetrical patterns with toppings? and teach basic ideas of fractions. 1/2 pie – 2 pieces the same size …

  • MEASUREMENT (give them a real tape measure at 5/6 yo, with the OSH talk)

  • tape measure – arms, legs, strides; door posts, table height, step treads, etc ..

  • How long is your thumb in centimetres? how long is your cubit? stride? doorway

  • estimation  … sensible answer?

  • How many wheels on those 3 trucks and 4 cars …? How many legs on those bugs …?

  • gardening, planting, design …

  • patterns and series, eg diff types of leaves, 10×10 (100 block) colour in …

  • map / atlas reading – note scale, NESW, distances/time, latitude / longitude, poles …

  • bus timetables – how long to go from A > B… every how many minutes …

  • for fun, learn to count to twelve or twenty in 5 different languages

  • draw shapes w/ruler, pencil, protractor, and compass

  • Big and Bigger numbers : what does 1000 look like? 1,000,000 …

  • consider big counting questions. How many chickens killed every day in NZ/the USA? How many trees in a particular forest? How many glasses of water before a particular water reservoir runs out?

Keep mathematics as an everyday part of life. The siloing (isolating or separating off) of maths and other disciplines is what sucks the joy, discovery, and relevance out of them. http://learning-reimagined.com/conrad-wolfram-maths-reimagined/

Of course you could use YouTube and Textbooks, but keep the interest and fun factor high.

http://www.mathscentre.co.nz/

http://www.interest.co.nz/calculators

http://libguides.unitec.ac.nz/diymaths/integers

http://gregtangmath.com

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top-teaching/2013/12/using-lego-build-math-concepts

http://www.youtube.com/user/MyWhyU

http://www.mathsisfun.com/

Stand and Deliver

keep-calm-and-stand-and-deliver

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“Stand and Deliver”

  1. Topic is chosen – timekeeper selects adjective and noun or short phrase

    (maybe contributed to by other speakers in group)

  2. Speaker stands up, ready to be given topic by timekeeper

  3. Once topic is given, speaker has 15 seconds to think of an outline, then has 60 seconds to speak.

  4. Timekeeper ‘tings’ when time is up and speaker stops.

  5. Feedback : first comment is general and positive (pick out one good thing),

    1-3 comments of improvement/to work on,

    finish feedback with 1-3 positive comments and encouragements for future.

Presentations

  • Connect with the audience – smile, speak their language on a topic they can relate to

  • Careful with “throat clearing” activities just before you start speaking, eg. um…, well…, fiddling with papers, not looking calm and collected

  • Connect the ideas within your talk

  • Give details, be specific – think 5 Senses

  • Inject gentle joy and humour

When reading,

  • Hold out your book (in one hand, if possible) so the top of it is below the level of your chin

  • Relax, smile, and use some eye contact

  • No affectation or pommie/plummie accent

  • Be slow and purposeful

  • Open your mouth, use your lips

  •  “nice round vowel sounds”

  • Use phrasing to help meaning

  • Project your voice from back of throat

  • “superb sage sausages searing in the sizzling seas”

June 2014

NZ Homeschool Exemption Application thoughts for those overseas

* My instinct is to apply once you’re here with some sort of NZ address, 6yo is legal age to be in school, but don’t rush/fuss. Just settle in to life here, without school.

* Exemption form is available online – http://www.minedu.govt.nz/Parents/AllAges/EducationInNZ/Homeschooling.aspx
Don’t be spooked by talk of 15 page applications – not sure that’s needed.. 

* Use the outline of the application as your title heads, including subjects (I did, though made a disclaimer about the artificial nature of subjects ‘boxes’ as life is more wide ranging and mixed up than that) – and succinctly fill in their (MOE) boxes.

* Timetables and lesson plans are not necessary as all you need to show is that you ‘teach as regularly and as well’ (s.21, Ed Act, 1989).
Talk about regular meals, and maybe more sit down work in morning. 

* Timetables are something wonderful to hang on walls to make someone else more secure but really are a work of fiction as we respond to the interesting world and families around us.

* Use of words like :: possibly, maybe, could be … are wonderful hs exemption form words!

* Expect to be asked for more info from MOE (min of ed) – it’s their way of trying to make us feel their power over us, methinks.

* In the meantime, think about what you want to achieve between now and 18yo.
What type of child would you like to train up? How will you bring out the best in them?
What are your family’s mottoes/ values/ priorities – this is where you spend most time in the next decade or so. I made a comment about wanting them to be contributing citizens who are honest, respectful,…

New to Homeschooling?

Find a way to enjoy family life.

Go for walks and have fun discussions, ask questions.

Instill the love of learning and discovery, rather than a rigid school-like ritual.

Invite yourself around or invite other families around to mix life up a bit.

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Homeschool Encouragement

As a species we are NOT created to function alone. We are made for community. We need each other to support, build up, correct, give hope.  And God IS with us.

Mothers, Home educators – I pray that each of you are released from the burden of thinking that you have to homeschool and train up your children alone. yay!
You are not alone.
“You don’t have cos you don’t ask”

Draw people in to your family life/school/work :
Pray in or seek for pretend-grandparents, if yours aren’t in town.
Pray in a ‘big sister’ for yourself, someone about 15 years older who is at a different stage in life to you.
Get your child/ren surrounded with aunties (real or adopted) and  other homeschooled families.

Organise low-key outings/events for the purpose of engaging, inspiring, and encouraging each other.

Blessings.

Homeschooling Under Fives

A lot of learning happens without pens, pencils, felt pens, books even (shock, horror). Mix up whatever you do, working with the stages of your child/ren.foundations of faith child tree

Homeschooling is nothing mystical or special – it’s just enjoying running in the park, turning over leaves, window-shopping, engaging with the world around you like a happy (I’d like to say, normal) family. Books and desks are not the only way to learn reading and writing (that’s what schools do and it kills the pleasure of learning often) – enjoy life around you doing ordinary everyday life stuff.

Lego, cars, blocks, balls, boxes, being mother’s little helper are excellent imagination starters for 2-3 year olds. Remember you are the mother and if you want them to sit and ‘read’ a book with you for a few minutes, then that is what you work towards.

Choose what is really important to you and your family in life (your priorities), then pursue those. You are answerable to God, your husband and child/ren, and yourself for the choices you make. If your child isn’t speaking and reading by the time he’s 10-11 yo, then come and see me. (But you probably won’t need to)   🙂 

Don’t buy in to others’ comments. Comparison is a killer – it leads to pride or shame/ rejection/ depression. None of that stuff you need on top of the responsibility of being the fantastic mum + helpmeet that you are.

The best thing for your child’s mind is you smiling, chatting, touching, engaging – even for short bursts throughout the day.

Enjoy!

Pan Fried Cajun Chickpeas

Pan Fried Cajun Chickpeas

A fun way to serve up chickpeas as a snack or salad topping!

Ingredients

  • 1 (400g) can chickpeas
  • 2-3 tsp corn-flour
  • 2-3 tsp Cajun (or Berbere or similar) seasoning
  • 2-3 T. olive oil
  • sea salt, to taste

Instructions

  1. Rinse and dry chickpeas on paper towel. Be sure to dry completely.
  2. Heat oil in a non stick skillet over medium high heat.
    Combine corn/flour and seasoning in a small bowl or plate.
    Roll chickpeas in seasoned flour until lightly dusted.
    Carefully add chickpeas to skillet, in batches, cooking for a few minutes before gently tossing them around in pan.
  3. Cook chickpeas until they look crisp and lightly browned.
    Remove from pan and serve warm.

Warning :: addictive!