Who Feeds The Children?!

Parents are responsible for their children, despite the Nanny State thinking that they are.
Parents have brains.
Parents need to know the power of good nutrition.
Parents can choose to only allow “good” food habitually in their homes.
Treat foods need to not have a HOME in our homes.
Know the difference between food and food products. Choose the former.
Parents, grow up and be good parents.

Advertisements

What Curriculum?!

Who is going to determine what your child needs to learn?

For under 12s, talk hug read laugh dance listen run play bake games parks libraries socialise (haha) – just live and enjoy family life.

Join in with others – anyone can advertise on their local homeschool group to create a Park Day. Advertise a few days in advance – and if you’re the only ones there – you enjoy yourself anyway.

What do YOU (the adultparent) want your children to be like by the time they are 18 years old? 🙂 (They can’t not learn – provide a fun safe curious environment)

Trust your children.

Homeschooling Under Fives

A lot of learning happens without pens, pencils, felt pens, books even (shock, horror). Mix up whatever you do, working with the stages of your child/ren.foundations of faith child tree

Homeschooling is nothing mystical or special – it’s just enjoying running in the park, turning over leaves, window-shopping, engaging with the world around you like a happy (I’d like to say, normal) family. Books and desks are not the only way to learn reading and writing (that’s what schools do and it kills the pleasure of learning often) – enjoy life around you doing ordinary everyday life stuff.

Lego, cars, blocks, balls, boxes, being mother’s little helper are excellent imagination starters for 2-3 year olds. Remember you are the mother and if you want them to sit and ‘read’ a book with you for a few minutes, then that is what you work towards.

Choose what is really important to you and your family in life (your priorities), then pursue those. You are answerable to God, your husband and child/ren, and yourself for the choices you make. If your child isn’t speaking and reading by the time he’s 10-11 yo, then come and see me. (But you probably won’t need to)   🙂 

Don’t buy in to others’ comments. Comparison is a killer – it leads to pride or shame/ rejection/ depression. None of that stuff you need on top of the responsibility of being the fantastic mum + helpmeet that you are.

The best thing for your child’s mind is you smiling, chatting, touching, engaging – even for short bursts throughout the day.

Enjoy!

Children Eating Vegetables

Fruit salad and tortilla wraps for a healthy lunchNote that there is no hyphen in the title : Children eating vegetables. It would be tragic if it was : Children-eating Vegetables.

It was never difficult to get our children to eat vegetables.

We taught them the colours of the rainbow (ROYGBIV) by what’s on the plate (good thing we had a blue tablecloth).
Meals are habitually at the dinner table.

:: Also if they weren’t keen on first taste: “That’s OK, we’ll try again another time.”
No stress attitude; add in the fun of trying new things … no problem.

:: No menu was offered. Eat what’s on the plate, one reheat, and, if not finished within two minutes of the last adult, finished! and what’s left on the plate is the first thing you eat next meal. Not surprisingly, I think that only happened twice.

Children hear things

child hear

Children hear things adults say.

Written in a child’s heart. Like a curse, if negative.

Help them to hear God’s Truth and Love and Blessings.

.

Encourage.

Encourage.

I read an article discussing phrases for encouraging children.

Here is my Pinterest board of various pics / posters that could be hung around the home, as reminders.

Encourage.

 

Mother Knows Best!

mother knows bestI’m chuckling here thinking again about last Thursday – another interesting day in our homeschooling life.

My 13 yo boy wakes up Thursday morning. This is the best day – sports action, then music (keyboard). Really good!

My 15 yo daughter is joking about ways to get out of going to Sports action (netball/ball skills), doesn’t want to go, would rather do anything else.

We’ve always made plans in one of three ways: 1. Mum+Dad make the decision (‘cos we’re the parents/adults and think, in the big scheme of things, this will be a good thing for you to do.
2. Let’s talk about the fors/againsts together, then M+D will ultimately make the decision, taking into account what you say.
3. Let’s talk about it, then you (children) make the decision, and M+D will work with you to help make it happen.

Sports was a #1 decision. You’re going, you’re going for at least two terms, you’re going to enjoy it, give it your best shot.

By the end of sports, 13 yo boy has badly bruised finger, realises he hasn’t brought his music, and is whimpering, declaring it’s a bad day, wanting to bail out on music (which he wasn’t allowed to).

15 yo girl enjoyed running around, seeing some different young people, and got complimented by the coach on her netball skills in the second game of netball she’s played. Let’s go to sports every day!

We’ll happily bundle into the van next Thursday, hopefully with the music bag, snacks and drinks …

Shows that sometimes we can listen too much to what our kids want and what they don’t.

Most times, Mother DOES know best!